6 Do’s of a Freelancing Contract

Freelancing ContractLike any other business, the freelancing business is also full of fraud and scam. So, it is you yourself, who decides whether you make a profit out here with your skills or…just get cheated by the scammers.

It is not difficult to create a good business in this field if you have the right skills and keep your eyes open in spite of the scammers. All you need is to go through these simple guidelines with 6 don’ts of a freelance contract and apply them with the following points below. Be careful to follow each of them and you will do just fine.

6 Do’s of a Freelancing Contract

1. Always be vigilant while signing the freelancing contract

The “what” and the “who” of the project is the most important thing about the project. This means you should be careful while going through the basics of the project. The basics of the contract define the roles and responsibilities of everyone involved in the project. So, it is necessary to put it in the contract even if everyone involved in the project is familiar with it. The importance of the basics is to draw a framework of the project.

Be strict about your work so that the client doesn’t make you work for those parts you are not concerned with so be specific about your job in the contract.

2. Be sure to include deadlines as a part of the freelancing contract

Many people don’t like deadlines as they feel pressured. They think working without the deadlines will be a profit for them but actually they are at a big loss.

Some clients take major benefits out of it and make you work more and more. They will always come with point of improvement and you can’t refuse… so you keep on working over the same project again and again. The smart move is to fix a time frame for the project and mentioning it in terms and conditions of the contract. This will also let you know when you are moving to the next project.

Be sure to fix the time frame in which the client has to respond back with corrections, doubts and questions and put it in the contract. Also give a fixed time to the client to come back with room for improvement after the project is launched. Also, fix the deadlines so that it gives you enough time to finish the project but never forget to mention it in the contract.

3. Always mention how you will be delivering the final product

Always mention the final product and the way you will deliver it. This saves you from any conflict with the client. The client will also be fine if the product is delivered in the types of files he can access.

It gives you and the client both some peace if this is mentioned as a part of the contract. It also tells you about the client’s knowledge about the project and his area of work. You will also have an idea how he is going to handle the product once you hand it over to him. You will also know the type of assistance he will need further.

The other thing you need to take care of is that once you are done with the projects, just send it in a simple fashion. Don’t attach extra piles of files in order to impress the client. If you want to do good business you need to take a project, finish it within time and send it to the client and move to the next project. Don’t get stuck in a project.

4. Always mention your payment in the freelancing contract

For most of the freelancing jobs the payment is more convenient in terms of project than hours. So, always include the payment in the contract so that the client doesn’t try to negotiate or back off at the time of payment. Mentioning the payment in the contract saves you from being a victim to change the payment or terms of payment by the client.

Agreeing on the initial deposit protects both the parties if either wants to back out. The client should understand that this clause makes you and the client committed to the project. Also include a ‘Cancellation Clause’ in the contract. It states the financial obligation of the parties in case the project gets terminated in between.

5. Alterations and revisions beyond a limit should be charged and make this a point in a freelancing contract

You must include a clause mentioning the number of times the revisions and alterations are allowed within the fees. The client generally abuses the privilege of having the option of requesting changes. To prevent such a situation there should be charges if the request goes beyond the limited number.

Be sure that you don’t use this clause to harass your client, and the time duration and number of times the alternations are allowed should be reasonable.

It is just for those clients who come back again and again unreasonably to distract you. Don’t punish every client for this and see if they are asking for reasonable alterations. This industry works on reputation of your work so never let anything destroy it. Don’t be arrogant to avoid revisions because they pay for your quality and creation. Without them, you can’t afford your creation.

6. Be professional and clear

The freelancing contract should be clear enough for both the parties to understand. Be professional and don’t cheat. Keep every minute detail in your contract to avoid arguments. Define the roles of both the parties clearly. If you don’t work professionally no one is going to care for you or your skills.

If you want to flourish in this industry you need to be smart enough to make profits without causing loss to anybody. Build a reputation by your professional behavior and effective communication with your customers and clients. Be clear enough about your job and profits.

You need to be careful that nobody hampers it. For all this you need to design a smart and fair freelance contract which includes the benefits of both the parties as well as give a glimpse of your smartness and professionalism.

Any suggestions on freelancing contract? Leave your comment below…

6 Tips – How to Avoid Freelance Scams

In the last few years, freelancing has become a preferred way of earning a second source of income. For some people like writers, web developers, journalists and online designers, freelancing is their primary source of income.

Freelance ScamsOwing to the vast economic problems in both developed and developing countries, people find it lucrative to work online and earn a decent amount of money.

How to Avoid Freelance Scams

As a beginner, you can become a victim of online freelance scams. The scammers are not behind: as numerous freelance opportunities emerge, they find new ways to scam people online.

You won’t find mailer-list scams as you would have five or six years back, but today you will come across more serious scams that really look authentic, erasing the subtle features that distinguished genuine money making online opportunities from scams.

Common Types of Freelance Scams or Work from Home Scams:

[1] Ad Typing Jobs
[2] Home Product Assembly
[3] Envelope Stuffing
[4] Medical Billing
[5] Multi-Level Marketing Affiliations (where no ‘real’ product-selling is not involved)
[6] Email Processing Jobs
[7] Book Typing Jobs

Basically, any advertisement that promises huge earning potential with little time input and no details whatsoever should be completely avoided.

Since scammers are also brainy intelligent people, they too have found ways to make their so-called make money online businesses too lucrative for people to resist. If you have found any freelancing or work from home that falls in the above common types, here are some warning signs you should be looking out for and some steps that you can take to make sure the jobs are genuine.

[1] Avoid any kind of work from home or freelance jobs that requires you to actively participate in seminars, that is, the company asks you to attend seminars to actually know how the work from home option works.

Please note that there are some genuine companies, mostly writing companies, which sometimes organize meetings to train freelancers regarding work profiles.

If you have been contacted by such a company and it’s located in your state, you can take a chance and visit. Otherwise, if it’s a company selling products and requires you to learn about direct selling, it’s best to avoid.

[2] The payment you are supposed to receive is either too good to be true or is based on advertising revenue. These kinds of freelancing offers should be avoided as well.

For instance, if you are a newbie and a freelance writing gig offers you $500 for a 500 word blog post, it’s clearly a scam. Again, freelance writing gigs based on advertising revenue may not be a scam per se but it’s not a beneficial way of earning. Why? Where is the guarantee that your blog or article will lead to advertisement clicks? Is there any? No.

[3] If you find freelance opportunities too good to be true, you need to perform a background search.

For instance, check the Yellow Pages for a record, do a WhoIs online search for website details, search about any complaints against the company in BBB (Better Business Bureau) records, or you can check with the states general’s office and ask for work from home scams (if any) are registered against the company.

[4] Never fall for freelance gigs that ask you to send money either for more information or to get a membership.

For instance, freelance websites like freelancer.com, elance.com, guru.com or odesk.com do not have a mandatory policy to take memberships. If you want or feel that a membership will benefit you, you can purchase monthly memberships, otherwise, these freelance sites are free to use and their genuineness is time proven.

Be careful of individuals who ask for money to send work from home details. They are surely scams.

[5] You should never take any kind of home freelance jobs at face value. Never take them for granted. Perhaps the only disadvantage of freelance work is that there is no sense of permanency or certainty with jobs.

The job you are doing now may continue for 2 months or 2 years, who knows? Therefore, if you are associating yourself with any company that offers a freelance/work from home option, try to get contractual work.

[6] Favor working with those people or companies that have a social media presence like a page on Facebook, a Twitter account, active blogs or active participation in forums. Such people or companies are more genuine than those without any social media presence.

Finally, the best ways to steer clear of work from home scams or freelance scams is to Google the company name or the individual’s name and see what kind of responses you get. In the end, the judgment is yours.

Have you been scammed? Share your story below…